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PostHeaderIcon Recipes That Fight Bad Microbes and Boost The Immune System

I really want to reach out and let you all know that I miss you and that I’m thinking of you, so I decided this is a good time to share some family recipes. This is what I eat when I feel under the weather and I never get anything worse than a common cold (knock on wood). I’m still quarantining with the rest of you. The gym industry has been temporarily shut down, so I have a little more time for cooking.

These recipes are a tasty way to get many foods that boost the immune system and kill invaders. Plus, they keep you well hydrated which is so important.

The two recipes I want to share are: “Abuelita’s Ginger Tea” and “Rhea’s Killer Chicken Soup”

When I first got married, my husband told me that his Abuelita (Grandma in Spanish) swore by a family recipe that healed any sore throat. Abuelita is a strong woman, now in her 90’s. We attribute her longevity to the fact that she takes great care of herself and always does what the doctor says. She’s even outlived some of her kids and she’s had ten!

Here’s the recipe:

Photo by Dominik Martin on Unsplash

Abuelita’s Ginger Tea

Take some ginger root and slice them into thin pieces. If you can handle stronger tea, add more ginger. The more the better.

Add hot water, dried fruit and honey. I usually add raisins. But you can add dried apple, pear, cranberry or jujube. Whatever suits your taste.

I’ve also tried this with chamomile or other herbal teas. Lemon is a great additive, as is cinnamon. The great thing about making it yourself, is that you get to flavor based on what gives you pleasure.

Here’s what I do to guarantee that I don’t get sore throats. It may or may not work for others, but it always works for me.

First, I make sure to ingest the tea at the first sign of a sore throat. If I ever get a sore throat, you can bet that I probably didn’t bother to make this miracle tea.

Second, I chew on the ginger and eat every slice. To make this less harsh, I eat it with the dried fruit. I usually chew on some raisins and ginger at the bottom of the cup. The sweetness of the dried fruit counters the bitterness of the ginger. Then I gulp down the tea to help ease it down.

Even if you don’t have it in you to chew up fresh ginger, the tea will definitely shorten the duration of a sore throat or can cure it all together.

All the ingredients in this tea are high in antioxidants which help protect against disease.

Honey is an antitumor, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and cardiovascular potentiating agent.

A study on ginger found that it inhibits the main microorganisms that cause oral infections. References and links to scientific studies below.

The next recipe is like a delicious atomic bomb that kills foreign invaders. But the ingredients are all foods that will promote health and boost the immune system.

Photo by Monika Grabkowska on Unsplash

Rhea’s Killer Chicken Soup

For this soup you need:

a head of cabbage

chicken cutlets

1 onion

1/2 to 1 garlic bulb

2 inches of ginger

vegetable oil

I cup frozen veggie mix (your choice of veggies. I usually get a mix of broccoli, cauliflower, carrots and yellow squash from Costco)

1 can of chicken broth

pepper, turmeric powder, cumin powder, dried dill weed, or any other spice you’d like to add. Cayenne pepper is optional for a kick.

This should feed a family of 5, give or take, depending on how much your family can eat.

Chop up ginger, onions, garlic, chicken and cabbage.

Sautee ginger and vegetable oil in a pot. After about three minutes, add garlic and onions. Sautee for about three to five minutes in high heat.

Add can of chicken broth plus two more cans of filtered water (If you have hypertension, check the broth’s sodium content. Some chicken broths have a lot more sodium than others)

Bring to a boil.

Add cabbage. Let it simmer till cabbage has softened a bit.

Add frozen veggie mix and chicken

Add spices.

Simmer till cooked.

While there is no cure for the common cold and we still do not know enough about the corona virus to know if garlic helps, many studies have shown that garlic does kill infectious bacteria and can significantly shorten the duration of a cold.

Cabbage and broccoli are known to combat other disease causing microbes.

All the veggies in this soup have antioxidants and anti-inflammatories, which help boost the immune system and slow down the aging process. All the veggies are rich in fiber and pre-biotics which help feed healthy bacteria in our bodies which also boosts the immune system and can help fight bad invaders. All the veggies help the liver function which can aid in metabolism and detoxification. All the veggies in this soup have cancer fighting properties.

The amino acids in lean chicken are the building blocks for enzymes and catalysts in the body which build anti-bodies which fight infections.

The warm water in the soup helps alleviate nasal congestion

For bonus vitamins, add an egg or two. Egg yolks contain vitamin D, which is known to boost the immune system.

If all these veggies are not enough carbs for you, feel free to add noodles or potatoes to this soup. Just make sure you do some cardio afterwards and burn off those extra calories.

I want to make it very clear that these recipes are not cures. They are suggestions on how you can eat healthier and be at a lower risk of mortality.

Please see references below.

That being said, I know we’re all going nuts due to the quarantines and lock downs. I just want to send some healing energy and (germ free) hugs. I miss you and I hope to see you soon. Hope you enjoy the recipes.

If you’d like some information on taking classes or getting quality personal training over the internet via skype, feel free to contact me:

rhea.morales@gmail.com

References:

Curcumin, an Active Component of Turmeric (Curcuma Longa), and Its Effects on Health

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26528921/?from_term=temeric&from_pos=1&from_exact_term=turmeric

Rapid Healing of Peptic Ulcers in Patients Receiving Fresh Cabbage Juice

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/18104715/?from_term=cabbage%2C+ulcers&from_pos=4

Cumin (Cuminum Cyminum L.) From Traditional Uses to Potential Biomedical Applications

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26010662/?from_term=cumin&from_pos=1

Antimicrobial Activity of Broccoli (Brassica Oleracea Var. Italica) Cultivar Avenger Against Pathogenic Bacteria, Phytopathogenic Filamentous Fungi and Yeast

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29112318/?from_term=cabbage+and+bacteria&from_page=2&from_pos=5

Assessment of Antimicrobial Potential of 10% Ginger Extract Against Streptococcus Mutans, Candida Albicans, and Enterococcus Faecalis: An in Vitro Study

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24047828/

Preventing the Common Cold With a Garlic Supplement: A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Survey

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/11697022/

Vitamin D and the Immune System

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21527855/

Towards a Better Understanding of the Therapeutic Applications and Corresponding Mechanisms of Action of Honey

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29101693/?from_term=honey&from_pos=3